Category: Dayton Triangles

Posts and excerpts related to the book I’m working on about the history of the Dayton Triangles American football team, 1916-29.

Update: Week of April 15, 2019

Starting this week, I’m shifting my focus away from stock music and toward the Dayton Triangles podcast that I’m working on. “Triangles” will be, for the foreseeable future, my number one priority. I’ve reached the conclusion, after working on stock music exclusively for almost three years, that it has become commoditized. There are simply too […]

Update: Week of April 8, 2019

It feels like the week just past was a “lost” week. I announced in my last update that I was starting production on the Dayton Triangles podcast. I was preparing to do that Monday when my wife Danita left work with nausea and severe abdominal pain. soon after, she went to the ER, where the […]

Bruce standing beside NFL first game historical marker

Special Update: March 31, 2019

If you’ve read any of my past updates, you’re aware that I’ve been working on a book about the Dayton Triangles since late last fall. To recap, the Triangles were one of the original National Football League teams. I originally hoped to finish the writing and find a publisher by the 100th anniversary of the […]

The NFL’s First Replay Controversy?

The research for my Dayton Triangles book project took me into the period when Triangles player/coach/manager/owner Carl Storck continued to serve as an NFL executive after the sale of the Triangle franchise. This post discusses the first of two major controversies in Storck’s brief, stormy tenure as league president. My focus here is less on […]

Dayton Triangles Championship Year: 1918

As I continue my research with the goal of writing a history of the Dayton Triangles football team, I’m struck by 1918. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Triangles’ “championship year” that saw them acclaimed by consensus as the best team in the Ohio League. But it was also a strange, and in […]

Draft Excerpt: A Wild Finish

Many in attendance became excited and rushed onto the field. Police tried to restore order but were unable to do so. The game ended with the crowd still on the field.